Movement in a State of Rest

February 27 - April 2, 2016

The Nature of Forms

March 28 - April 25, 2015

Frank Sherwood White

 

Bio

 

Frank Sherwood White received a degree in photography from The Rochester Institute of Technology in the late 1970's and resides in Houston, TX. He is a Lecturer at Rice University’s School of Architecture, where he has taught photography for the past 20 years along with being one of Houston’s most sought-after commercial photographers. It was this successful career that awards him the freedom to explore his art photography and his quest to illustrate interesting perspectives found in the natural world around us.

 

Artist Statement

 

My work is play. I play with words and concepts in order to reach past my automatic assumptions. Play is the doorway to the alternative realities that lie dormant inside the objects and other stimuli that I mindlessly encounter throughout the day. I want to experience what is actually in front of me in all of its incarnations without being limited by the biases of my pre-conceived notions.

 

I love irony and am inspired when a slightly humorous incongruity exists between what I would automatically assume about a subject and what actually exists in reality. Humor almost always provides the spark. The concepts that get developed come from situations where the humor and incongruity strike me in a way that is unforgettable, although often, the resulting series ends up being expressed as a serious subject

 

The Nature of Forms, challenged my automatic assumptions on a variety of levels. It began, pretty typically, in humor and surprise. Discovering that a rock could be more than just a rock, and going on field trips to find and collect body parts has that intriguing combination that sets everything in motion. I started with the intention of creating images that explore our inability to see and comprehend what is right in front of us. During the process I found myself wondering about time and timelessness and point of view and the individual relativity of those concepts. That led to thoughts about the nature of permanence and impermanence, and the short and long term implications involved when one assumes that these forms will last forever. At the same time I was fascinated by the way the organic and inorganic forms parallel one another and the randomness of the physical forces that shaped them both. It amazes me how all of these concepts emerge through the comparison of rock and body forms.

 

 

Artist CV

 

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