Andy Feehan

Artwork

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Andy Feehan
Andy Feehan was born in Houston, Texas, in 1950. After graduating cum laude from the University of St. Thomas, Houston, in 1974, he earned an MFA from the University of North Texas, Denton, in 1977, during which time he was also a Teaching Fellow. Feehan has exhibited in numerous shows, including a solo show at the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston. Group shows include Fresh Paint: the Houston School and The Texas Landscape, 1900-1986, both at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. He has also shown his work in Chicago, Dallas, Ft. Worth, and New York, and he was featured in the 2001 New Orleans Triennial at the New Orleans Museum of Art. His work is in many private collections. Public collections include the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Feehan relocated to France in 2005 where he currently lives and works. A Brief Statement About the Series “Doors" For the past three years I have created a body of work about doors. The sources of my imagery have been local buildings, dwellings and occasionally commercial places. On a material and historic level, I am intrigued by the manner in which these places are put together, and I am moved by the stories they hold in silence…lives of families, births, deaths, and by a modern world that has passed them by. I live in a village that has roots back to the Gallo-Roman period, and although buildings of that era are long gone, the footprint of the original place is still here. The houses and other buildings that appear in my work are abandoned, shuttered, and crumbling. Although the architecture is regional and very French, for the most part I wish to avoid any overt references to France per se, and I hope my paintings escape geography by virtue of their execution and by virtue of the mood they evoke. My motives involved in making the work are, externally speaking, based upon a fascination with a state of decay, délabrement, and the forces and events that created that state. I also believe that, internally, the work expresses a certain melancholy in my own life and is my way of coming to terms with it. And of course we can think of doors metaphorically too. We are all really never in one place. We are all moving, physically, mentally, spiritually, from one state to another. A door is a transit, maybe even to another dimension entirely. Traditionally, paintings are considered to be two-dimensional, and pictorial depth within those two dimensions is achieved through the use of linear perspective, color, depth of focus, and placement of elements. However, I have been augmenting those principles with various kinds of sculptural relief, resulting in a sense of space that is suspended between two and three dimensions. Some of the work in this series is purely two-dimensional, but a good deal of it involves sculptural augmentation in depths up to eight centimetres.
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Artist